Introduction

Project description
The gate house was part of a refurbishment scheme to create residential living space. Due to the presence of several bat species, the living accommodation was carefully isolated from the existing roosting spaces.
Ecologist’s name and contact details
Cotterell Thomas & Thomas LLP
Brief site description
Clackencombe Lodge is a Grade II* listed gate house, which is part of the Ashton Court Estate in Bristol. It is situated in a rural landscape, which includes fields, woodland and ponds.

Pre-works roost structure

Type of structure
Building
Use
Domestic Dwelling
Condition
In Use
Main construction material of walls
Stone
Roof design
Other
Roof material
Stone
Internal roof structure
Timber Frame

Pre-works roost description

Species
Greater horseshoe bat
Number of bats max count
Not reported
Type of roost
Maternity Roost
Evidence of bats
Bats Recorded Emerging/Re-entering
Roost location
In Roof Void
Aspect of roost
various
Height of roost entrance (m)
Various
Roost material(s)
Nearest commuting feature
Hedge
Distance to nearest commuting feature (m)
Not reported

Proposed works

Description of works
The gate house was part of a refurbishment scheme to create residential living space. The aim was to create living accommodation alongside the bat roosts, allowing the bats to continue using the building. The living accommodation was therefore isolated from designated bat areas, which were subsequently enhanced for maternity use.
Type of impact upon the roost
Temporary Damage and Loss of Roost

Proposed mitigations

Type of mitigation
Mitigation
Specific technical detail of measure
The existing bat areas included access to full roof void, ensuring its full length was available for 'light testing'. One tower was allocated for bats by creating a route from the roof to the ground-level single story modern extension. This was modified to provide roosting ledges and a maternity environment. All windows and doors were removed from the extension and the building disguised with planting. Its interior layout was design by a bat consultant. Bespoke exits and entrances were provided into the roof and tower. Canopy cover was maintained from the building to the adjacent woodland. Materials: Extension - breeze block. Roof exit - lead. Tower entrance - timber.
Relevant annotated figures
Roost location
In Roof Void
Aspect of roost
S
Height of roost entrance (m)
Not reported
Roost material(s)
  • Brickwork
  • Timber Roof Frame
Nearest commuting feature
Hedge
Distance to nearest commuting feature (m)
Not reported
Photos or annotated figures of roost

Actual mitigations implemented

Type of mitigation
Mitigation
Specific technical detail of measure
The existing bat areas included access to full roof void, ensuring its full length was available for 'light testing'. One tower was allocated for bats by creating a route from the roof to the ground-level single story modern extension. This was modified to provide roosting ledges and a maternity environment. All windows and doors were removed from the extension and the building disguised with planting. Its interior layout was design by a bat consultant. Bespoke exits and entrances were provided into the roof and tower. Canopy cover was maintained from the building to the adjacent woodland. Materials: Extension - breeze block. Roof exit - lead. Tower entrance - timber.
Relevant annotated figures
Roost location
In Roof Void
Aspect of roost
S
Height of roost entrance (m)
Not reported
Roost material(s)
  • Brickwork
Nearest commuting feature
Hedge
Distance to nearest commuting feature (m)
Not reported
Photos or annotated figures of roost

Monitoring data

Length of monitoring proposed
Not reported.
Frequency of monitoring
A camera was installed for ongoing monitoring.
Type of monitoring
Roost Inspection
Evidence recorded
There has been a measured increase in the number of bats using the building. The maternity section is in use.
Interventions made
None reported

Final details