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Differentiating Daubenton's bat from other Myotis bats

  • It is rarely possible to confidently differentiate Daubenton's bat from other Myotis species based on listening to their calls alone
  • Daubenton's bat can be confused with Natterer's bat, which sounds similar (though weaker and more like a rapid crackling)
  • Typically Natterer's bats fly erratically above the level of Daubenton's bats and tend not to trawl the water's surface
  • Daubenton's bat can be confidently identified when observed skimming over the surface of water
  • If you hear and observe a Myotis species and you are confident it is not Daubenton's bat, then do not record it on your form
  • If you hear a Myotis species and are unsure whether or not it is a Daubenton's bat (i.e. you cannot see whether it is skimming over the surface of the water) then record as "Unsure Daubenton's bat"

The audio clips on the right illustrate the subtle differences between:

  • Daubenton's bat calls heard on a detector tuned to 35 kHz (rapid, fairly regular dry clicks)
  • Natterer's bat calls heard on a detector tuned to 45 kHz (faster and more 'crackly')
  • Whiskered bat calls heard on a detector correctly tuned to 45 kHz (more erratic, pipistrelle-like rhythm)

NB these differences are not diagnostic as these species can sound very similar when flying in similar environments.

Don't forget that if it is a Myotis species then the tone won't change much as you tune around on your detector. If you hear rapid, dry clicks and the tone gets richer or deeper as you tune around then it may be a pipistrelle in a cluttered environment (see previous page).

 

 

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 Natterer's bat flight pattern

Click here to listen to Daubenton's bat from a detector tuned to 35 kHz


Click here to listen to a Natterer's bat from a detector tuned to 45 kHz

Click here to listen to a whiskered bat from a detector tuned to 45 kHz

 


 

The Bat Conservation Trust retains intellectual copyright of the material contained in this tutorial.
Any unauthorised use will be considered a breach of that copyright.