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Differentiating Daubenton's Bat From Pipistrelle Species

  • Pipistrelles usually use a slower repetition rate than Daubenton's bats (7-10 pulses per second compared with Daubenton's bats' 13+ pulses per second)
  • The tone changes as you tune around on the detector (Daubenton's calls sound more or less the same at different tunings)
  • Sound is rich and deep when you tune close to 45 kHz
  • Pipistrelle rhythm is more musical and 'syncopated'
  • In a cluttered environment (e.g. close to trees) pipistrelle calls can become shorter and more rapid and sound similar to Daubenton's bat; try tuning around and if the tone changes or the sound fades away below 40 kHz then it is more likely pipistrelle
  • Pipistrelles appear fast and jerky in flight and tend to fly just above head height or higher

The audio clips on the right illustrate the differences between:

  • Daubenton's bat calls heard on a detector tuned to 35 kHz (rapid, fairly regular dry clicks)
  • Common pipistrelle calls heard on a detector tuned to 35 kHz (slightly less rapid, irregular high-pitched 'slaps')
  • Common pipistrelle calls heard on a detector correctly tuned to 45 kHz (as above but deeper 'slaps')
  • Nathusius' pipistrelle calls heard on a detector correctly tuned to 37 kHz. You may encounter this rarer species which sounds similar to common pipistrelle but is best heard when tuned between 37-40 kHz.
  • Common pipistrelle in a cluttered environment. Sounds similar to a Myotis species such as Daubenton's, but the tone will change as you tune around and will fade as you tune below 40 kHz (though may reappear at around 25 kHz on some detectors - this is an artefact of some models of bat detector which causes sounds to be heard at half the frequency, e.g 50 kHz sounds are also heard more quietly at 25 kHz)

 

 

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 Pipistrelle flight pattern

Click here to listen to Daubenton's bat from a detector tuned to 35 kHz


Click here to listen to a common pipistrelle from a detector tuned to 35 kHz

Click here to listen to a common pipistrelle from a detector correctly tuned to 45 kHz

Click here to listen to a Nathusius's pipistrelle from a detector tuned to 37 kHz

Click here to listen to a common pipistrelle in a clutterered environment


 

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Any unauthorised use will be considered a breach of that copyright.