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Land Owner's Permission

If your route enters private or restricted access land you will need permission to enter from the landowner, custodian or land manager. You will receive a letter from BCT to identify you to land owners and to explain your purpose in your survey pack.

It may take time and effort to identify who owns the land and gain permission. Sources of information about landowners include:

• Parish Council
• District Council
• Unitary Authority
• County Council land register
• Parks departments
• National Park Authorities
• Local people
• Local pub

For protected areas you may need to contact the relevant statutory nature conservation organisation (Natural England, Scottish Natural Heritage, Countryside Council for Wales or Environment & Heritage Service).

It can be difficult to get hold of information on who owns what field, and their contact details, by telephone or remote sources. Often it is easier to knock on the doors of local farmhouses and ask who owns which field and for permission to survey.

Always take someone with you if you are fact-finding in this way. If you are asked questions about bats and the law or planning issues please refer them to us on the BCT helpline on 0845 1300 228.



 

 

 

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Record land owner details and which section of the route that they apply to on the form provided. Please ask them to sign the landowner permission box if possible.

If permission is refused, don’t worry, just alter your route. If a large part of the square is inaccessible, contact us and you may be advised to choose another square.

If you are surveying a repeat site, details of landowners (where known) will be provided but you will need to check well beforehand in case of any changes.

Once you have permission to access the site you should always try to notify at least 24hours in advance of your intended arrival and give alternative dates where possible (but do mention that the survey is weather dependent).


 

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Any unauthorised use will be considered a breach of that copyright.